Monthly Archives: March, 2013

Cincinnati Red Stockings

With Opening Day on April 1st for the Cincinnati Reds, I find it only appropriate to write a little about the Redlegs.

1869 Red Stockings

1869 Red Stockings

Founded in 1863, the Cincinnati Red Stockings were finding their way to the professional baseball field. In 1869, they became all-pro. Between 1869 and 1870, the Red Stockings were on an unstoppable 130 game win streak, until their defeat no thanks to the Brooklyn Atlantic’s.

Several years later they shortened their name to just the “Reds” and started playing on Redland Field (Crosley Field). In 1970, Crosley was out dated and the Cinergy-Riverfront stadium was used. In 2003, the modern Great American Ball Park was erected in place of the demolished Riverfront Stadium.

Crosley Field, back in the good ol' days

Crosley Field, back in the good ol’ days

Here’s another fun fact that changed the history of the United States: in 2006, president George W. Bush was the first sitting president to throw the ceremonial first pitch, in none other than Great American Ball Park.

Even though it’s only named Great American after the insurance company that owns it, the Great American Ball Park reflects the American Spirit that is alive and thriving in the greatest city in the world, Cincinnati.

Union Terminal

The year is 1931 and people need an easy way to move about that’s faster than walking and easier and cheaper than owning a car. What moves at high speeds and transports large amounts of people at a relatively low cost? Is it a bicycle? No! Is it a skateboard? No! Is it an airplane? No! It’s a railroad!

North side taxi ramp inside the original building

North side taxi ramp inside the original building

Originally a railroad station, Union Terminal was completed and open for service in 1933. Before the terminal, there were 5 small, cramped stations throughout the city connecting to 7 railroads. Union Terminal provided a large, spacious alternative to these.

Originally referred to as a city within a city because not only was it a place to hop aboard 100 tons of steaming metal, but it held a men’s and women’s clothing store, a bookstore, a toy store, food stores, news stands, and a barber shop. Everything one could possibly need all in a convenient location!

Original Barber Shop

Original Barber Shop

The 180 foot wide and 106 foot tall half-dome was the second largest in the world, right behind the Sidney Opera House. Unfortunately, the City built this right around the Depression, so train travel was on the decline and the terminal wasn’t a huge success for a while. In 1972, Union Terminal closed down its train travel for good due to the huge decrease in railway transportation.

Fast forward 20 years to 1990 where travel by locomotive is nearly comical, and the Cincinnati Museum Canter was born out of the terminal. It now holds several shops, an Omnimax theater, Duke Energy’s Children Museum, Cincinnati History Museum, and a Museum of Natural History and Science. The Museums are almost like a time capsule to those in Cincinnati, taking visitor’s back to simpler times when the main concern wasn’t what was going to be on TV tonight.

Although it may have seemed like a bust in the past, Union Terminal is now one of the most iconic structures to Cincinnatians.

Modern Union Terminal at night

Modern Union Terminal at night